9/27 English 2

ANTIGONE-ESSAY

Directions:

Please answer the question thoroughly. You must use direct and indirect quotations to support your thesis statement.

Please write an introduction, two paragraphs of support, and a conclusion.

PROMPT:  Identify one of the play’s main characters (Antigone or Creon) as a tragic figure and discuss why, using textual evidence, he/she meets the criteria for a tragic figure.

 I. Introduction (3-5 sentences)
A. Hook: Grab the reader’s attention with a quote, scenario, vivid description, etc. Must be related to your topic. (1-2 sentences)
B. Thesis statement: Simply and clearly state your position on the issue (1 sentence)
II. Body Paragraph One
A. Topic Sentence
B. Concrete detail – evidence with a citation – one sentence
C.  Commentary – 2 sentences
D.  Concrete detail – evidence with a citation – one sentence
E. Commentary – 2 sentences
F.  Conclusion

III.  Body Paragraph Two
A. Topic Sentence
B. Concrete detail – evidence with a citation – one sentence
C.  Commentary – 2 sentences
D.  Concrete detail – evidence with a citation – one sentence
E. Commentary – 2 sentences
F.  Conclusion

IV.  Conclusion Summarize

A.  restate your thesis statement and three arguments in different words
B.  Make a closing statement. Tie your closing statement back to your opening hook.

9/27 Eng 1 and Eng 9RCP

Today was a work day on the advertisement project.

The project is due tomorrow at the beginning of class.  It should have three items in the packet:

  1. rough draft advertisement with dialogue
  2. final draft original pictures storyboard and dialogue
  3. grading rubric

 

9/26 Drama Agenda

  1. Engage in pantomime activity where the box in front of me is invisible and I can pull anything out of it I can dream of.
  2. Notes on Pantomime

    What is pantomime?

    Pantomime is the art of acting and storytelling without words or sounds.  It is an art that develops non-verbal communication using facial expression and body language to create elements of character, plot, space, and action.

    Movement

    Pay specific attention to the size, shape, resistance, and weight of any object that you incorporate into your pantomime.  Isolate movement so that we see the effect of a specific action or gesture on each individual part of your body.  Make sure that each section of your pantomime is part of a motivated sequence:
    We experience stimulus (something happens)
    We think about it
    Our body responds to it

    Character

    Create a strong character with definite personality traits and mannerisms.  Let the character feel emotions and experience all sorts of moods.

    Story

    Create a simple story line that is easy to understand.

    Rehearse and Revise

    Pantomime takes a lot of practice to become perfect.  Try a number of ideas and then use the ones that you feel comfortable with.  Have other students or your teacher watch you perform, discuss what is not clear, and get suggestions on how it could be clearer.  Once you think you have the basics down, rehearse it over and over until you are sure it is perfect.  Then rehearse it again.

    Limitations of Pantomime in Competition

    If you wish to compete at Region and State Drama Tournaments with your pantomime you must conform to the following rules:

    Pantomimes can have one or two people
    Pantomime time limit is three to six minutes long
    The only prop allowed in pantomime is one chair per person
    Pantomimes must be silent – no talking, sounds, or music is allowed.

  3. How?
    Consistency
    – keeping objects the same size, in the same place, etc.
    Exaggerated Resistance – define and make movements sharp and crisp, make every movement bigger than life
    Exaggerated Facial Expression and Gestures – keeping expressions and gestures specific but bigger than life
  4. Activity where each student attempts the randomly chosen simple activity to pantomime using the strategies above (ie shopping and paying for items)

9/26 English 1 Agenda

Sneeze:

Which three of the following skills are the most important for success in life?  Why did you chose those three?

Patience, common sense, humor, courage, creativity, resourcefulness, work ethic, organization, integrity, pride, responsibility, flexibility, compassion, love, kindness, self-control, obedience, independence, discernment, initiative, wisdom, wit, friendliness

Today we continued working on our advertisements, and organized to make a real storyboard using original photographs, props, and costumes.  Creative process, writing, imagery, and persuasion are important factors of this assignment.  See attached for rubric.

quote.storyboardrubric

 

9/26 English 2 Agenda

9/26/17 Sneeze!

What is a “tragedy” or “tragic” event in life and/or literature? How might someone be both tragic and heroic.

Tragedy sorrowful or terrible events encountered or caused by a heroic individual.

Hero comes from a Greek word meaning “any person who shows courage in the face of challenges.”

The ancient Greek philosopher, Aristotle, called any hero who faced a downfall, a tragic hero. The downfall resulted from fate, a societal reason, and most importantly, the hero’s own flaw or mistake.

Tragic Hero!

Review Aristotle’s elements of tragedy:

  1. Tragic Hero: A hero who begins life with wealth or status until his fatal flaw or error leads to his downfall. The audience is meant to feel both pity for the character and fear for themselves since the tragic hero suffers the worse-case scenario as a result of his avoidable mistake. Examples of tragic heroes include: Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Oedipus Rex, and Brutus.
  2. Anagnorisis: The moment when the hero makes an important discovery.
  3. Catharsis: The audience’s feelings of pity and fear.
  4. Hamartia: The hero’s flaw that leads to his tragic downfall.
  5. Hubris: A hero’s extreme pride and disrespect for the natural order of the world.
  6. Nemesis: The unavoidable fate of the hero, usually caused by his own hubris.
  7. Peripeteia: The hero’s experience of a reversal of fate or fortune.

Create your own tragic hero, illustrating seven elements of a tragic hero in a seven-panel Storyboard:

  • Identify the element in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the hero as it relates to one of the elements.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

9/25 Drama Agenda

Complete last two presentations from Friday.

Show videos on Del Close and Viola Spolin. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JxH9ZuylAg and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HavVR2SC_bg

Play game.

Have each group generate a few new products, ones that no one has ever seen before and write each on a separate notecard.

Tell the players they are now an advertising agency, letting an eager public know about this great new product and how useful it is.

Players should build on everything their teammates say, starting each sentence with “YES, and…”

Insider Tips:

  • Choose a suggestion card from a group other than the one that’s on stage so they don’t get their own.
  • Hold them accountable to starting with “YES, and…” and to building on what others say.
  • If they start to fumble or slow down, offer encouragement (“Tell us more!” “What makes it so special?”) without suggesting ideas.

Assign groups to games.

9/25 English 9RCP

Sneeze:

“It was death by notebook.”

Write your creative response to the above.

Today we continued working on our advertisements, and organized to make a real storyboard using original photographs, props, and costumes.  Creative process, writing, imagery, and persuasion are important factors of this assignment.  See attached for rubric.

quote.storyboardrubric

 

9/25 English 2

What is a thesis?  Find thesis frames and definitions attached here:

After we completed the mini lesson, the students got into small groups and wrote their own thesis statement using the theme work we did with “Antigone” in the prior class.  Then we peer corrected by passing each thesis from group to group.